Wednesday, February 10, 2016

THE CHATTERING CLASSES VERY SURVIVAL IS DEPENDENT ON THE CREATION OF AN UNDERCLASS

That's you and me, guys!

This concerns a country whose use of phenomenal innovation is being radically controlled by heavily invested conglomerates. The working man/woman is rapidly being constrained into servitude, all of which is indentured to a global service economy. 

This exchange of labour has seen the private and political elite prosper, leaving the thankful worker to gratefully survive off shared economy scraps! Yes fellow cabbies, that's the trickle down effect in all its glory.



Politicians and the right wing media work symbiotically to promote the myth that the ones who should be held responsible for our Nations insurmountable social and economic woes are those at the bottom rather than the grotesque 1% perched at the top. The Taxi Trade epitomises a position in society that the government needs to subordinate and is currently being subjected to relentless destabilisation. 

Make no mistake, what appears to be gutless passivity by our licensing authority, is actually a very active drive to silence a somewhat influential voice, i.e, the London cabbie. There will be peripheral casualties along the way, but as Travis Kalinik stated, they amount to no more than collateral damage. Of course the government hasn't been able to achieve this alone, so they furtively manoeuvred themselves to facilitate an en masse assault on an entire public service. 

Three years ago the government still could have implemented ground rules, but now, the predatory, heavily financed Corporates (the kind that gets kicks by implanting aggressive virus’ into your laptop) are holding the reins, and the government can be no more than its bitch.

The Taxi Trade is being left in limbo, not knowing who is ultimately responsible or who to trust. But let's be clear, the powers that be are fully aware the Taxi Trade is not an industry that's defunct, an argument that could, with some validity, be levied against the coal miners in the early 1980’s. No, the Taxi Trade remains an extremely relevant, valued, and self sufficient business. 

And therein, brothers and sisters, lies the underpinning to our problem. Britain no longer manufactures anything, most of the middle classes have moved into phoney jobs often endorsed by some bullshit name like ‘Management Consultancy’. Transport for London is awash with this sort of middle class soup, bankrolling over 400 executives on six figure salaries (Sir Peter Hendy is still pocketing £600,000 pa for a 4 day week at Network Rail). TFL’s pot runneth over with faux jobs.

The taxi trade’s independence is viewed by the movers and the shakers as a loose cannon that poses a threat to these self-created elevated positions, and any loose change outside the parameters of the corporate umbrella was always going to be a target for those in Management Consultancy. 

They fully understand that most of the working classes aren't afforded the same financial flexibility as we are to sustain a long enough protest to cause any real damage. To a degree, we can navigate around certain obstacles, that is, unless we let them block off our lifeline. The taxi trade can still- just about- shine the spotlight on the injustices that are covertly being inflicted on Britain’s workforce. It is debatable if the trade has the clout to shift some of the emphasis where it belongs, onto the shoulders of those in power. But whatever, we need to try, we really do need to try.

Have we forgotten the gargantuan effort it took to get through ‘The Knowledge?’ Have we lost the connection with who we did it for and why we did it? Have the toffs beaten us with the stick a few too many times for us to psychologically mount an effective comeback? Really? 
Are we that detached from our resolve? 

No one can ever understand what it's like until they've endured The Knowledge through to completion. As much as some might decry or belittle it, they can never truly understand. Cast your mind back to the day of your REQ. On that day, if you were given the choice of, either winning the lottery or being awarded your Green Badge, which would you have plunged for? 

The process each and everyone of us undertook was equally as rewarding as the result. It's no revelation, that those who go to university, the majority of which will go on to complete their degree, not so with The Knowledge. To see it through to the end really does take Goliath sized resolve.

Uber, yes Uber- the Valdemort of the taxi business- has a controlling capacity goes way beyond anything we have ever known. They control content and are rapidly increasing their control over data flows, user activity, and access on person related data. The opportunity for wide scale surveillance are also taken into account by those in authority if only to control and monitor city traffic. Surveillance capacity was always going to instil the authorities sycophancy to technological controlled service Industries.

The control of contents by Corporations like Uber affords them the opportunity to embed censorship into customer software (in Uber’s case the primary consumer is the driver, not the passenger). Their emerging dominance is already redefining terms and conditions as well as how functional models are used. 

They will continue to remould working directives/ business parameters, including trade regulations, protections, benefits and responsibility. In the short term, one might see the illusion of freedom that these start up platforms offer as attractive, only later to find out that they’ve bought into a lifetime of enslavement. Hook, line, and sinker!

The next time you hear ‘Lets Uber’ give them cause to think on, soon they may not have the option. It’s easy to comprehend too why they would want to be included in what appears as a kind of fascist utopia, only to be jolted awake to the fact that it isn't utopia at all, but a vile regime that we have been complicit in creating, and is now inescapable

They say the greatest trick the devil ever pulled was to make us believe he didn't exist. I believe, the Devils greatest trick was to convince us that our neighbour is an enemy. Your neighbour might not have too much sympathy if you, the ‘cabbie’ next door is put out of business, they may gloat even, oblivious that he is just being used as Devil fodder. Tomorrow, it'll be the fella who lives opposite who'll be gloating as your neighbours job now sinks out of existence, and so on, and so on...

The sad truth is, the government will do anything to obtain and hold on to their slice of the pie. 
God isn't going to save us, neither are the Orgs. If we don't at least try to save ourselves, then we are ripe for the picking. 

Somehow, we need to dig down and reattach ourselves to the resilience that it evident in all of us, we just need to vigorously shake it out of its slumber. There is a new kind of destroyer in town. It has the same objective as the old enemy, except this time it has much deeper pockets!

It's either Fight or Die!



THE FIGHT STARTS AT GRASS ROOTS LEVEL!

THIS IS NOT ONLY A FIGHT FOR THE TAXI TRADE, THIS IS A FIGHT FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE! 

LET’S MAKE OUR OWN LUCK
Sean Paul 

Meanwhile In Parliament, Andrew Jones (PUS DoT) Says Extra 700 PHVs Every Week OK.

Tuesday, February 09, 2016

United Taxi Demo Could Be The Biggest Taxi Demo Ever Seen In London...by Jim Thomas



Carpe Diem : In the Wake Of The EU Taxi Alliance Demo, Tomorrow... It's Our Turn....and this time, we are UNITED.

Many drivers complain that every time we demo, the media say it's about Uber

Well, lets get one thing straight
UBER are not the elephant in the room!
UBER are at the centre of our demise.

If we are scared to mention Uber, then we've already lost.

This demo is directed towards Downing Street, to highlight the fact that the government's no1 and no2 are heavily involved in supporting this company, at our expense.

TfL, on orders from this government have turned a blind eye to existing regulations in order to facilitate the expansion of UBER. You don't have to be a genius to work out their agenda.

We are not frightened of competition and this demo is not about fair competition 

It's about unfair completion.

Watch passionate speech from Trevor Merrells, Campaign Manager of the UCG 


     

In the media today :


LAST NIGHTS FLASH DEMO:

David Cameron left the Tory Ball at the Brewery Last night and was unexpectedly greeted by a cacophony of angry taxi drivers shouting and using their horns, as a flash demo was called over social media.

The RD2 clipboard man was angry as his hoard of touts were kept at bay, as departing guests chose the licensed Taxis plying for hire outside.


Many top Tories were picked up but licensed Taxi drivers who explained in detail what is going on with the interference from Dave and George in regards to TfLs back door deregulation approach to Uber. 
Many of the departing guests were surprised at what they were hearing first hand and pledged their support for the iconic London Taxi trade.  

TfL Press Release : New Tariffs for 2016



Index Component1

Cost Increase

Weight2

Contribution to Total3

Data availability4

Last Year

Latest

Vehicle Cost

8.6%

9.1%

0.8%

N/A

Parts5

1.8%

4.2%

0.1%

November 2015

Tyres5

1.8%

0.6%

0.0%

November 2015

Garage & servicing – premises5

1.8%

0.6%

0.0%

November 2015

Garage & Servicing – labour5

1.8%

2.0%

0.0%

November 2015

Fuel6

-12.8%

10.6%

-1.4%

Sep – Nov 2015

Insurance7

11.3%

4.5%

0.5%

November 2015

Miscellaneous

0.8%

1.0%

0.0%

N/A

The Knowledge8

2.4%

5.4%

0.1%

Aug – Oct 2015

Social Costs8

2.4%

2.8%

0.1%

Aug – Oct 2015

Total Operating Costs

0.6%

40.7%

0.3%

 

Average national earnings8

2.4%

59.3%

1.4%

Aug – Oct 2015

Grand Total

3.0%

100%

1.7%

 

 

Notes

1.  The index components are as normally used in the cost formula. Further details are available on request.

2. ‘Weight’ is the proportion that the component contributes to the total cost per mile.

3. ‘Contribution to total’ indicates the importance of each component’s cost change in determining the overall cost change. It is calculated for each component as the product of its percentage cost increase and its weight. The Grand Total is the sum of the individual components’ contributions.

4. The ‘latest’ column under ‘Data availability’ indicates the dates to which data in the ‘cost increase’ column relates.

5.  As agreed in 2011, costs for Parts, Tyres and Garaging will be uplifted by the yearly change in the Office for National Statistics RPI figure for “motoring expenditure: maintenance of motor vehicles” (DOCT) published on 15 December 2015. 

6. The change in fuel costs relates to the change from the average of the AA diesel price for the 3 months to December 2014 to the 3 months to November 2015. This figure will be revised as further monthly data becomes available.

7. As agreed in 2011, costs for insurance will be uplifted by the yearly change in the Office for National Statistics RPI figure for “motoring expenditure: vehicle tax and insurance” (DOCV) published on 15 December 2015. 

8. Provisional Knowledge, Social Costs and Average National Earnings changes are based on the year on year ONS average weekly earnings growth for the three months to October 2015.

 

TfL Pricing & Forecasting

23 December 2015

 

Appendix 2 

Details of taxi cost calculations

This table shows the cost per mile of each cost component in 2014 and 2015. 

 

Component of index

Cost p per mile in 2014

Proportion of costs in 2015

Cost p per mile in 2015

Increase in costs 2015

Contribution to total increase

Vehicle Cost

21.25

9.7%

23.08

8.6%

0.8%

Parts

9.89

4.2%

10.07

1.8%

0.1%

Tyres

1.46

0.6%

1.49

1.8%

0.0%

Garage & Servicing - Premises

1.34

0.6%

1.36

1.8%

0.0%

Garage & Servicing - Labour

4.74

2.0%

4.83

1.8%

0.0%

Fuel

24.92

9.1%

21.73

-12.8%

-1.4%

Insurance

10.53

4.9%

11.72

11.3%

0.5%

Miscellaneous

2.35

1.0%

2.37

0.8%

0.0%

The Knowledge

12.64

5.4%

12.95

2.4%

0.1%

Social Costs

6.48

2.8%

6.64

2.4%

0.1%

Total operating costs

95.60

40.3%

96.24

0.7%

0.3%

Average national earnings

139.16

59.7%

142.51

2.4%

1.4%

Grand Total

234.76

100.0%

238.74

3.1%

1.7%

 

 

Note that increases are rounded to one decimal place in the table, but greater precision has been used in the calculations.

Vehicle Cost

 

Four strategies have been considered for purchasing a cab:

 

1.       Purchase new and run to scrap, 

2.       Purchase new and sell at 4 years, 

3.       Purchase at 4 years and sell at 8, 

4.       Purchase at 8 years and run to scrap. 

 

Table 2 below gives the costs for the 4 strategies (as supplied by LTC in 2015). They relate to TX4 models for all strategies. 

 

Table 3 shows the corresponding costs provided for 2014.

 




 

In October 2015 Vito taxis made up 11.6% of the fleet. Purchase costs for these taxis and the TX models have been weighted using this figure to provide an overall average purchase cost.

 

The average cost over 12 years in 2014 was £62,652 or 23.73 pence per mile. The average cost for the same strategies in 2015 was £68,257 or 25.85 pence per mile, giving an increase of 8.7 per cent.

 

Pence per mile rates have been calculated assuming an annual vehicle mileage of 22,000 miles. 

 

Parts, Tyres, Garaging & Servicing

In 2011 a study was conducted comparing the changes in costs associated with parts, tyres, garaging and servicing incorporated into the cost index over recent years with the yearly changes in the Office for National Statistics RPI figure for “motoring expenditure: maintenance of motor vehicles” (DOCT). The study concluded that the two series were comparable and it was agreed to use this ONS RPI figure to represent these cost index items in future.

 

In November 2015 the DOCT RPI series showed an annual increase of 1.8 per cent. This gives an increase in the cost per mile of these components from 17.43p in 2014 to 17.75p in 2015.

 

Fuel

The Derv price index from Arval, which has been used to calculate the change in fuel price, was discontinued in 2013. In deciding on an alternative source of fuel price data analysis of London diesel prices from the AA (available at www.theaa.com/motoring-advice/motoring-costs.html) shows close correlation with the Arval Derv price index. Based on AA data last used to calculate the index, the average fuel price over the three months to December 2014, was compared with the AA average price over the latest three months to November 2015. This gives a value of 110.6p per litre compared to 126.9p, giving a decrease of 12.8 per cent.

 

Insurance

A similar comparison to that made for parts, tyres and garaging costs was made of previous years’ cost index insurance figures versus the ONS RPI series figure for “motoring expenditure: vehicle tax and insurance” (DOCV), and again it was decided to use the RPI figure in future cost index revisions.

 

In November 2015 the DOCV RPI series showed an increase of 4.7 per cent compared to the benchmark October price level used to calculate the last index. This gives an increase in the cost per mile of these components from 10.53p in 2014 to 11.72p in 2015.

 

Miscellaneous

This comprises the cost of hiring a meter, smoke test, vehicle licence and driver licence. The average cost in 2014 was £481 or 2.35 pence per mile. The average cost for the same strategies in 2015 was £485 or 2.37 pence per mile, giving an increase of 0.9 per cent. 

 

Earnings Related

The latest average weekly earnings data (headline rate ONS series KAC3) show a 2.4% increase for the three months to November 2015, compared to the three months to November 2014 used for the 2015 index. This gives a cost per mile figure for the updated index of 142.5p, representing 59.7 per cent of the total index cost.  

 

The “knowledge” and “social” costs have also been uplifted each year in line with national earnings. In 2015 these increased to 12.95p and 6.64p respectively, together representing a further 8.1 per cent of the total index cost.

 

TfL Pricing & Forecasting

23 December 2015

 

Appendix 3

Tariff Changes – 1.6 per cent average increase[1]

 

Tariff Changes – 1.6 per cent average increase

 

Average Fares

 

 

Current average

New average

Increase (£)

Increase (%)

Tariff 1

£11.51

£11.69

£0.18

1.6%

Tariff 2

£13.34

£13.56

£0.21

1.6%

Tariff 3

£15.67

£15.92

£0.25

1.6%

All Week 

£12.72

£12.92

£0.20

1.6%

 

Tariff Rates – 1.6 per cent average increase

 

 

 

Tariff 1

Tariff 2

Tariff 3

 

 

Current

New

Current

New

Current

New

minimum fare[2]

£2.40

£2.60

£2.40

£2.60

£2.40

£2.60

minimum units

2

2

2

2

2

2

metres/unit < 6 miles

126.2

123.9

102.5

100.6

82.7

81.2

secs/unit < 6 miles

27.1

26.6

22.0

21.6

17.8

17.5

metres/unit > 6 miles

88.5

86.9

88.5

86.9

88.5

86.9

secs/unit > 6 miles

19.0

18.7

19.0

18.7

19.0

18.7

Units at lower rate

76

77

94

95

116

118

Metres at lower rate

9591.2

9540.3

9635.0

9557.0

9593.2

9581.6

changeover fare

£17.40

£17.80

£21.00

£21.40

£25.40

£26.00

 

Example Fares – 1.6 per cent average increase


  

All example fares assume entire journey charged on distance rates

Tariff times 

·        Tariff 1: Monday to Friday between 06:00 and 20:00 

·        Tariff 2: Monday to Friday between 20:00 and 22:00, Saturday and 

·        Sunday between 06:00 and 22:00  

·        Tariff 3: Every night between 22:00 and 06:00, Public holidays



[1] An increase of 1.6% has been selected as the 1.7% increase in fares calculated this year is offset by the 0.1% decrease calculated last year, which was not implemented.

[2] The minimum fare is increasing from £2.40 to £2.60